Chris Essig

Walkthroughs, tips and tricks from a data journalist in eastern Iowa

Archive for October 2012

Going mobile with our news apps

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ImageIt’s been about two months since we launched our crime map for the city of Waterloo and so far, the response has been overwhelmingly positive.

I’ve been proud of our fans on Facebook, in particular, who are using the map to make informed opinions on crime in the area. One of our fans actually counted every dot on the map to counter another fan’s claim that crime only happens on the east side of town. He found crime was almost equally spread across the town.

In hopes that this data will be digested by an even larger audience, I launched the mobile/tablet equivalent of the map last week. The new app is fully responsive thanks to Twitter’s Bootstrap framework. If you haven’t check out Bootstrap, you really should. It makes designing websites for all platforms — desktops, tablets, mobile phones — about as easy as its going to get.

I also went in and modified  a lot of the CSS, changing things like the width of objects on the page from pixels to percentages. This ensures that the app looks great no matter how wide the screen you’re viewing it from is.

Serving up the tablet version of the map wasn’t particularly difficult. It’s basically the same map on our site without the header and footer, which seems to load slower on iPads. It’s also designed to be flexible regardless of how wide your tablet screen is.

The mobile version was more difficult. At this time, the mobile app does not have a map of the crimes. Instead, it’s just the color charts comparing different crimes and a table of all the crime data. I stripped out the map mostly because it’s difficult to click individual points on the map on small mobile screens. But screens continue to get bigger and nicer so hopefully this won’t be a problem in the future.

One pro tip: I set the padding-right CSS property on the table of crimes to 10 percent. This gives a nice cushion to the right of the table, making it easier for people to scroll past it on smartphones with touch screens.

For this project, I went about making the mobile version the completely wrong way: I opted to create just the desktop version at first and then go back and make one for tablets and phones.

Ideally I would have done both at the same time, which is easy to do with Bootstrap. And that’s exactly what I did for another project we launched this weekend on campaign finance reports. The project exams the finance reports for candidates running in four local races. The reports are made available by the Iowa Ethics and Campaign Disclosure Board, which fortunately allows users to export the data into CSV files.

We broke down the data and created bar charts using Bootstrap to compare the figures. The framework has several bar options to easily create the bar charts, which are worth checking out. The best part is they are designed to look good on all platforms.

We also have databases of all the contributions that are searchable. This allows readers to see exactly where the money is coming from.

For this project, I created the mobile and tablet equivalents of app as I was creating the desktop version. When viewing it on a desktop computer, the app is embedded on our website so it has the election header, footer and colors. The same app was created with responsive design in mind. So if you open it on a mobile phone, the app will look just as good on a tablet or smartphone as it does on a desktop computer.

Many studies show that more and more people are getting their news on smartphones. It is imperative that we keep those readers in mind when designed full-scale apps for our websites.

Hopefully we can continue this trend at the Courier and make sure our projects are reaching our full audience.

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Written by csessig

October 21, 2012 at 1:58 pm