Chris Essig

Walkthroughs, tips and tricks from a data journalist in eastern Iowa

Archive for January 2016

Save your work because you never know when it will disappear

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We are a few weeks into the new year, but I wanted to look back at the biggest project I worked on in 2015: The redesign of KCRG.com.

While most of my blog posts are full of links, I can’t link to that site. Why? Because it’s gone.

What?

In a series of very unfortunate events, the site we spent many, many months planning and developing is already gone.

The timeline: We started preparing for the redesign, which was BADLY needed, in early 2015. We then built it over the course of several months. Finally, it was launched in July. Then, in a move that surprised every one, KCRG was bought by another company in September.

At the time, I was optimistic that the code could be ported over to their CMS. And the site wouldn’t die.

My optimism was short lived. Gray has a standard website template for all its news sites, and they wanted that template on KCRG.

So in December, the website we built disappeared for good.

 

The KCRG website you see now is the one used and maintained by Gray.

Obviously, this was a big shock for our team. Even worse, the code we wrote was proprietary and requires Newscycle Solutions to parse and display. So even if I wanted to put it on Github, it wouldn’t do anyone any good.

I’m not used to the impermanence of web. When I had my first reporting job in Galesburg, I saved all the newspapers where my stories appeared. And unless my parents’ house catches on fire, those newspapers will last for a long time. They are permanent.

Not so online. Websites disappear all the time. And those who build them have barely any record of their existence.

Projects like PastPages and the Wayback Machine keep screenshots of old websites, which is better than nothing. But their archives are far cries from the living, breathing websites we build. A screenshot can’t show you nifty Javascript.

It’s an eery feeling. What happens in five years? Ten years? Twenty years? Will any of our projects still be online? Even worse: Will technology have changed so much that these projects won’t even be capable of being viewed online? Will online even exist?

Think about websites from 1996. They are long gone. Hell, many sites from two years ago have vanished.

I don’t have good answers. Jacob Harris has mulled this topic and offered some good tips for making your projects last.

But it’s worth pondering when you’re done with projects. What can I do to save my work for the future? I have a directory of all of my projects from my Courier days on an external hard drive. I have an in-process directory for The Gazette as well.

I hold onto them like I did my old newspaper clippings. Although, I’m confident those clippings will last a lot longer than my web projects.

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Written by csessig

January 21, 2016 at 11:52 am