Chris Essig

Walkthroughs, tips and tricks from a data journalist in eastern Iowa

Quinn calls for deep cuts; nobody likes them

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Gov. Pat Quinn’s proposed cuts

– Today was one of the most important days of the young legislative session, as the governor unveiled his proposed budget to the public. Not surprisingly, the proposal was very bleak. Quinn called for deep, painful cuts, including more than $1 billion in education funding, and basically dared the legislature to pass a 1 percent income tax (which is much lower than the first tax hike he called for). If not, the governor will be forced to go through with his education cuts, which could mean 17,000 teachers statewide are laid off. Talk about a depressing scenario.

Here’s the boss with more:

SPRINGFIELD — Gov. Pat Quinn offered Illinois lawmakers a choice Wednesday: Raise the state income tax or cut spending for schools.

In a 21-minute speech to a joint session of the General Assembly, the governor outlined a gloomy $55 billion budget proposal that relies heavily on borrowing more money and again would delay billions of dollars in payments to people who do business with state government.

With all eyes on the upcoming election, Quinn said lawmakers could face voters in November after either cutting $1.2 billion to local school districts or bumping up the income tax rate by 33 percent.

“I have made some difficult, painful choices in this budget,” the Chicago Democrat said. “You must make some tough choices as well.”

For the full article, click here.

– Quinn is basically playing a game of chicken with the legislature. But could it pay off?

State Rep. Bill Mitchell, R-Forsyth, said the cuts put forth by Quinn were used to scare lawmakers into supporting a tax increase.

“I think that is a strategic move on his part to probably box in the General Assembly,” he said.

But, the state’s dire money troubles might force action this year, said state Rep. Dan Brady, R-Bloomington.

“The mess that we’re in might force compromise that’s desperately needed,” Brady said.

Link.

It’s also possible that neither of the scenarios will come to life. Only time will tell.

– Other cuts (noted above in the graph) were touched on in his speech, but they were basically lost in the shuffle on Wednesday because of how severe his education cuts were. But I spoke with some local officials on Monday, who were paying particular attention to Quinn’s proposed $300 million cut to local governments. And they weren’t happy:

Pana, for example, may need to look into some kind of tax or fee increase to plug such a shortfall, Mayor Steven Sipes said Monday.

Because Pana’s property taxes are capped, city officials would have to consider water rate hikes or a utility tax increases if more revenue is needed, he said. Layoffs are an absolute last resort because the town of 6,000 only has 45 employees.

“It’s going to be devastating,” Sipes said.

Link.

Not good news for any one involved.

– Like his State of the State address last month, Quinn addressed a joint House in the Capitol. Fortunately, his speech today wasn’t nearly as rambling as the SoS address, and lasted only a fraction of the length. He, not unexpectedly, called for a income tax hike. But he noted it would be earmarked solely for education, which was the only new, groundbreaking comment made during the 21-minute speech.

After the speech, I scrambled to get reactions from as many local lawmakers as possible. I think I talked with seven lawmakers. Mike and I spoke with nearly 20 lawmakers in all.

Like our SoS coverage, we basically wrote five separate stories for each of our publications. Here’s a quick wrap:

– The other controversial component of Quinn’s proposal that didn’t get much fan fare was his plan to continue “strategic” borrowing to help the state stay afloat. Bill Brady attacked Quinn on this as well during a presser later in the day. I was all over it:

The Republican state senator from Bloomington was critical of Quinn’s proposal, saying it doesn’t solve the state’s fiscal crisis and instead relies on record amounts of borrowing.

Quinn wants to borrow $4.7 billion to help pay state bills and to roll over an additional $6 billion in unpaid bills to balance the budget.

“Today was an embarrassing day. He (Quinn) asked for an extra 30 days and yet the best he could come up with was a budget that is $4 billion out of balance,” Brady said, referring to Quinn’s request to delay his budget address by a month.

Brady noted that Quinn doesn’t have a plan to repay the borrowing he proposed, and is simply “kicking the can down the road, trying to make it past the election.”

“Quite frankly I wonder if he plans on being here in January because we have a pretty big problem,” he said.

I also shot a quick video of Brady bashing Quinn. I believe it’s the first video the Lee Enterprises’ Springfield bureau has put out, which I’m proud of. Take a look:

– In short, Quinn called for deep cuts today and nobody liked them. This could be a sign of things to come, so be prepared for a very contentious legislative session. And don’t be surprised if nothing get’s done…

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Written by csessig

March 10, 2010 at 9:47 pm

One Response

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  1. […] a comment » Many across the state are lining up to oppose Gov Pat Quinn’s proposed cuts, complaining they will be devastating, not only for schools across Illinois who could face more a […]


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